Archive for July, 2011

The Deathly Hallows…explained

Posted in Books, Movies with tags , , , , on July 22, 2011 by otakujade

The story of the Deathly Hallows was told in the Tales of Beadle the Barb.

The Deathly Hallows were three powerful objects given by Death himself to the Peverell Brothers. According to the story, hundreds of years ago at twilight the three brothers – Antioch, Cadmus and Ignotus – were travelling the countryside when they came upon a turbulent river and were unable to cross. Being wizards they created a bridge over the river to enable themselves to cross. Death was angered that he had been cheated of three victims and so avenge himself to the brothers he pretended to congratulate them on being so clever. To show his appreciation he offered to give each of them anything they so desired.

Antioch being a proud and competitive man wanted to be invincible to battle and so asked for a wand that can never be defeated. Death broke a branch from a nearby tree and made the Elder Wand, a wand more powerful than any in existence.

Cadmus wished to resurrect his lost love, and so Death took a stone from the riverbed and created for him the Resurrection Stone, a stone capable of bringing the dead back to the living world.

Ignotus, the last brother was wary of the gifts, he realized the danger of the situation and requested a means by which Death could not find him. Grudgingly Death took the cloak off his back and gave him the Cloak of Invisibility, a cloak that hides its wearer and never lost its power through curses or age.

Thus, the three brothers received the Deathly Hallows.

In time the brother went their separate ways. Antioch Peverell travelled to a wizarding village where he boasted of the Elder Wand in his possession. His throat was sliced in his sleep by a wizard hoping to take the Elder Wand for himself.

Cadmus travelled back home and used the Resurrection Stone to bring back the woman he loved, but was dismayed to find that it was only a pale imitation of her: the dead did not truly belong in the living world. In the end, Cadmus committed suicide by hanging himself so he could truly join her.

Ignotus used the cloak to remain hidden from Death for a long time. When he was an old man, he passed the cloak onto his son, greeted Death as an old friend, and went with him to the next world. The cloak continued to be passed on from father to child among Ignotus’ descendants over the years.  The Peverell name was lost over the years through the male descendants but it continued to be passed on through family members. Harry Potter without knowing it was in possession of one of the Deathly Hallows as early as the age of 11. He was a descendant of the Peverell family from the line of Ignotus.

The Resurrection Stone too was being passed on to descendants of the family and was lost for ages until it resurfaced in the possession of the Gaunt family. It was later made into a ring, however, neither Marvolo nor Tom Riddle (Voldemort) knew of the value of the stone and Voldemort even made it into a horcrux. This was later destroyed by Dumbledore and then passed the stone onto Harry inside the snitch as one of the objects he bequest upon his death. Harry later used the stone to talk to his parents, Sirius and Tonks and Remus before he went off to face Voldemort in the Forbidden Forest. After which he dropped the stone in the forest floor and didn’t anyone except the portrait of Dumbledore in the headmaster’s office so no one will seek to fight it.

The wand however changed hands in the most violent ways. It was passed on to from wizard to wizard almost always through murder; for whoever snatches the wand from its over becomes its new master. Gregorovich, a Bulgarian wand maker used to own the wand until it was stolen by the young Grindelwald. Voldemort fought and defeated Grindelwald and so he took possession of the wand. Later, at the Astronomy Tower he was disarmed by Draco Malfoy and so Malfoy became the master of the wand but he never really physically possessed the wand. When Harry later disarmed Draco, even though Draco had a different wand in his hand at the time, the magic in it caused it to recognise Harry as its new master. Severus kept the wand in safekeeping, and it was laid to rest with the Headmaster’s body.

It eventually stolen by Voldemort at Dumbledore’s tomb but because he was not able to attain the wand by killing or over-powering its master he could not fully utilized its powers.

Possession:

The Deathly Hallows was never really in one person’s possession ever before ….until Harry.

Dumbledore was again to gain all of them but not all at the same time. Harry had them all in his possession and would have been invincible except that he chose to lose the Resurrection Stone, and broke the Elder Wand. The only one he kept was the Cloak of Invisibility which he might someday passed on to one of his children.

I’m betting it’ll be Albus Severus, the 2nd son.

The Horcruxes …explained

Posted in Books, Movies with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 21, 2011 by otakujade

I am actually doing this to help out a good friend of mine who hasn’t read the books and just saw some of the movies BUT wants to watch HP and the Deathly Hallows…so I hope I do a fairly decent job of explaining it. And if other people would benefit from it too…that’ll be great..

I am of the opinion that it will be quite hard for non-HP book fans to understand the full extent and implications of the final installment of the movie without knowing the background of underlying the plot.

HORCRUXES…what are these?

—based on JK Rowling’s own definition – “the receptacle is prepared by dark magic to become the receptacle of a fragmented piece of soul and that that piece of soul deliberately detached from the Master Soul to act as a future safeguard or anchor to life and to safeguard against death.

The act of creating a horcrux splits the soul allowing the Dark Wizard to hide a fragment of his soul into another object. Creating a single horcrux allows the dark wizard to resurrect himself in the event that his mortal body is destroyed. However, creating multiple horcruxes damages the soul that physically disfigures the wizard and diminishes his humanity.

The creation of the horcrux can be reversed by its creator through truly feeling remorse, though the effects of this can apparently be painful to the point of being fatal. It can also be destroyed by another person but it can be extremely difficult.  It requires that the horcrux should be destroyed beyond repair. All known methods of destroying horcrux are deadly – for example one of the earliest known means of destroying a horcrux is by administering basilisk venom on the object, however procuring that is near impossible.

Voldemort created seven horcruxes. According to JKR herself there are still seven horcruxes hidden and that these are the ones that Harry and the others must find and destroy. This, it seemed does not include the soul he is using at the moment. In any case, Voldemort survived after the curse he casts on Harry was deflected by his mother’s protection and rebounded on Voldemort himself. He then survived by drinking unicorn blood which is also considered an evil act. His body solidified to its current state due to a ritual performed by Wormtail in book 4/movie 4 (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire)

7 Horcruxes

  1. Tom Riddle’s Diary – this was destroyed by Harry in book 2/movie 2 (Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secret) using a basilisk fang.
  2. Marvolo’s Ring – destroyed by Dumbledore himself in book 6/movie (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince) although it was not clear how Dumbledore destroyed the ring it poisoned his hand. Snape was able to isolate the poison on the lower part of Dumbledore’s hand but it will eventually spread throughout his body killing him.
  3. Merope’s locket – Harry and the others found the locket in book 7 (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows)/ movie 7 part 1 and destroyed the locket using Gryffindor’s sword; the sword was a Goblin-made artifact and thus was able to imbibe qualities that strengthen it. When Harry used the sword to kill the Basilisk in book 2/movie 2 the sword absorbed the strength of the basilisk poison.
  4. Hufflepuff’s Cup – destroyed by Ron and Hermione in movie 7 part 2, again using basilisk poison.
  5. Ravenclaw’s Diadem – destroyed by Harry, Ron and Hermione in movie 7 part 2, using both the basilisk poison and Fiendfyre.
  6. Nagini (the snake) – killed by Neville Longbottom in movie 7 part 2 using the sword of Gryffindor.
  7. Harry Potter – more particularly his scar. Destroyed by Voldemort himself when he performed the killing curse on Harry (Avada Kedavra) however, as Harry passed through that space between life and death his soul separated from Voldemort’s soul and so he was able to go back and live on.

The horcruxes had to be destroyed (all of them!) before Harry faces off with Voldemort because then the Dark Lord will be weakened enough to be killed. Harry Potter can never be as strong as Voldemort but as with any fight everyone has a weakness even Voldemort. This was the weakness that they have been looking for since book 5/movie 5 and was only revealed in book 6/movie 6.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part 2…HUGE SPOILERS here!!!!

Posted in Books, Movies with tags , , , , , , , , on July 20, 2011 by otakujade

First off, I apologize that this took longer than I expected but RL caught up with me and I had to set aside writing my blog for a few days but anyways..it’s here now.

Harry Potter and the Death Hallows part 2 was probably THE most anticipated movie of 2011; it was the culminating piece to the 10-year run of the series and expected to create a big bang…and the movie did not disappoint. To say that the movie was enjoyable was probably the understatement of the year – it was memorable, enjoyable and all together magnificent.

The movie started right where it left off in part 1…it began even before the Warner Bros. logo appeared. Then it went right off to give a review of what took place during the last movie and dove right into the action sequence. The insertion of the now very familiar HP theme just at the moment when the trio decided to return to Hogwarts was done to create a feeling of nostalgia which greatly worked. Being a huge fan of HP from the very start, having followed the books (lining up in front of the bookstores when the next installment was supposed to come out) and then following the films…the scene pinched my heart evoking a reaction I can only describe as bittersweet.

David Yates did what many of his predecessors should have done – he did not try to compress a very complex and voluminous book into a 2 ½ movie but rather he took the time to stay “almost” religiously close to the original text and gave the story the width and berth that it deserved. True there were instances where the movie deviated from the book but those moments were few and tolerable, even to the point of being wholeheartedly welcomed. In truth, the movie clarified a lot of issues that the book was not able to do, and when it did deviate from the original text it was all for the betterment of the plot. Ultimately, Yates improved on Deathly Hallows.

In the film we saw what we would have wanted to see in the the book.  David Yates also gave us some of the things we would have wanted to find in the final installment of the book but didn’t. Here we saw Ginny, having broken up with Harry and yet the love between them was so obvious it was painful to see. Then even if you don’t see Ginny as much as you wanted to it was obvious that, at least in the film, she was a powerful witch and a very brave one too.

The film was basically dark and serious but there were moments of humor and these came from the most unexpected characters and at the most unexpected moments. We also saw McGonagall prove to us why she was Deputy Headmistress of Hogwarts. We all knew she was “supposedly a powerful witch, adept at Transfiguration” but who knew McG could kick ass – and a damn well good ass it was! Seeing McGonagall in a duel with Snape, I honestly grew nervous, not really sure who would win. Snape was a noted dueling master but who knew McGonagall could kick his ass! Wooot!!!!!!!

And then the scene..the moment that everyone was eager to see..the one that if the film makers did not include in the film you can be sure that fans will tear their hearts out and feed it to the dogs…maybe to Greyback ,who knew – Molly fighting with Bellatrix! Oh that moment when Molly said those memorable fine words “Not my daughter, you bitch!” the theater literally exploded with shouts and claps from the excitable audience. That was truly one of the highlights of the film. One of her sons had just been killed and she was in no mood to see anyone hurt her only daughter too!

And here we see the complexity of Snape’s character. It was rumored that all these years Alan Rickman kept a secret about the character that only he and JKR knew…and I guess this was it. Honestly, the scene of Snape’s death and the revelation of his memories did not affect me at all in the books; it lacked the right element somehow. But the movie brought it all out in full detail such that the scene was so emotionally packed. I was crying.

The idea that Snape could dedicate himself to protecting the son of the woman he loved just seemed so ridiculous in the book, however the way that it was presented in the film made it completely believable, even heart-rending. We were made to understand that few people ever got close to Snape, that he had loved Lily even when they were children and because he had little friends and almost no association with women, he loved her from afar. There had never been any other woman in his life except for Lily. He protected her even when he knew it would put him in danger, his affinity to Dumbledore had nothing to do with love or loyalty but rather he was indebted to the man from the day he promised to do anything if Lily and her family could be protected. He was willing to suffer as a double agent if it means protecting the woman he loves and those she loves. And yet there was nothing overly romantic or lovey-dovey sweetness about it, it was just plain devotion and pure love – it was tragic but beautiful.

Then came the horcruxes…Harry’s death was one the lamest part of book 7 for me and yet here it was presented and explained in such a way that it all became clear. How Dumbledore knew all along that Harry was a horcrux and in Snape’s words Dumbledore was raising him “like a pig to the slaughter”.  And yet again you are made to understand that it had to happen because without Harry they would never be able to find the other horcruxes. Voldemort needed to rise again to be able to be destroyed. And Harry has to die so that he could be separated from the part of Voldemort’s soul that was living inside him. It just all made so much sense all of a sudden.

And finally the last battle between Harry and Voldemort – the film wisely deviated here so that at the heat of the battle at Hogwarts you will rarely hear anyone use spells to fight. Now, in the book one of the parts that received the most criticism was the part when Harry defeated Voldemort with a simple Expelliarmus spell. The film brilliantly down played that part and rather had the characters fight without saying any spells. That was really a very, very smart move on the part of David Yates.

If there’s ever a spin off to be done on the story I wish they would make one about Neville and Luna, those two have developed into great characters but I just get this feeling that there was more to them. Neville finally proved without a shadow of doubt that he was a true Gryffindor, having been able to wield the sword of Gryffindor. And in the end killing Nagiri.

All in all it was a magnificent rendering of a very complex book and even more so since it was done in 3D. The subtle symbolism of farewell inserted here and there was really the proper way to say so long to the series. We were confronted with places and things we have come to associate with the Harry Potter story – we said goodbye to the Quidditch stadium as it burned to the ground, we passed through Hogsmead, the Sorting Hat all tattered and grimy but still useful, the boat house where the first years enter through….it was wonderful to see those places and things again.

The characters have grown up so much too over the decade, I guess that’s why I feel sort of cheated that Daniel seemed to have move on so quickly..but I guess they all deal with sadness differently. Emma immersed herself in her studies, Rupert will be taking a breather and Dan is drowning himself in his work.  I wonder when we’ll be able to see these actors and actresses again but whenever that  will be they will always be the magical trio of the Harry Potter fame for me.

Harry Potter: So long…but never Goodbye

Posted in Books, Introspection, Movies, Random, Uncategorized with tags , , on July 16, 2011 by otakujade


It’s 10:45 p.m. and hubby and I  just came back from watching HP 7 part 2….I am feeling sort of melancholy really….the movie wasn’t good…IT WAS GREAT! but somehow I feel like a beautiful chapter of my life had just come to a close.

For the last decade, Harry Potter had become a constant in my life. Harry Potter opened a lot of new doors for me…it is through Harry Potter than I became a part of several Yahoo groups, met a lot of wonderful people who have became an important addition to my life (friends who became so close to me they’re almost like family), and to my otaku friends Harry Potter is an added bond that we have aside from anime. My book, movie and memorabilia HP collection is something I am deeply proud of. They’re not that extensive but they were acquired with a lot of care and patience.

Watching the credits roll tonight was like parting with an old, trusted and dearest friend.  At one point I didn’t want the movie to end because then  I know there would be nothing more to look forward to from then on. This was the last installment of the series, and a part of me never wanted it to stop. The book series concluded in 2007  but somehow that didn’t feel as conclusive as this…somehow at the time I know there was still something to look forward to – several more movies in fact. This time really felt like the closing of a curtain. And still  a big part of me still cling to the magic that was Harry Potter.

Yes, MAGIC for that was really want it was all this time. JKR weaved a mesmerizing spell that bound us all these year; her character had taken on a life of its own and became part of history. I cannot think of any book or even movie that ever have this much following or loyalty.  The series is so popular that every book release or movie premier is considered an international event and hugely news worthy. Seven books, eight movies….and three endearing characters….

As people clapped at the end of the last scene, I sat there and heaved a big and heavy sigh…It is done, the Harry Potter series had ended. As all good things must come to an end, so too something even as beautiful and captivating as Harry Potter. To me this was like seeing an old friend go to some far away land, it is so long but not goodbye. For from time to time that friend will write an email or chat on line or call on the phone..still accessible but out of sight. So too will Harry Potter be…for from time to time I know I will still visit the books, relive the movies and remain friends with the people whom through Harry Potter have become an integral part of my life too…

To Bonnie, Jo, Chris, and Dawn….thank you for being a part of my life. To J.K. Rowling…thank you for the privilege of knowing Harry, Ron and Hermione. Thank you for Hogwarts, Hogmeads, for Snape, Dumbledore, Hagrid, and McGonagall – thank you for sharing this wonderful world of Harry Potter with us.

And to Harry Potter thank you for being with us…your presence will be a uniquely personal part of us your fans….and the Harry Potter world and culture will be an important and characterizing part of the generation that knew and experienced your world.

So long….till we meet again.